Sale!

Front-End Developer

$4,750.00 / week and a $20.00 sign-up fee

Monthly Rate*
  • Write website code with programming languages such as HTML, C++ and Java.
  • Produce, maintain and modify websites and user interfaces.
  • Incorporate applications, graphics, audio and video clips into client websites.
  • Create tools that enhance the user’s website experience.
  • Ensure websites are accessible across many types of browser and devices.
  • Routinely test websites for ease-of-use, speed and other quality/performance factors.
  • Fix website issues and bugs that arise.
  • Collaborate alongside digital creatives, data researchers, product managers and team leads.
  • Meeting with clients to discuss needs and function.
  • Optimizing applications for maximum speed.
How many months?

Or, Pay via Invoice

Project:

5 + 12 =

Background:

  • Proven work experience as a Front-end developer.
  • Hands on experience with markup languages.
  • Experience with JavaScript, CSS and jQuery.
  • Familiarity with browser testing and debugging.
  • In-depth understanding of the entire web development process (design, development and deployment).
  • Understanding of layout aesthetics.
  • Knowledge of SEO principles.
  • Ability to perform well in a fast-paced environment.
  • Excellent analytical and multitasking skills.
  • Team player.
  • Ability and skill to train other people in procedural and technical topics.
  • Strong communication and collaboration skills.

*Max allocation of resources limited to 160 hours per month.

HTML & CSS
HTML (Hyper Text Markup Language) and CSS (Cascading Style Sheets) are the most basic building blocks of web coding.
JavaScript
JavaScript lets you add a ton more functionality to your websites, and you can create a lot of basic web applications using nothing more than HTML, CSS, and JavaScript (JS for short). JS is used to create and control things like maps that update in real time, interactive films, and online games.
jQuery
jQuery is a JavaScript library: a collection of plugins and extensions that makes developing with JavaScript faster and easier. Rather than having to code everything from scratch, jQuery lets a front end web developer add ready-made elements to projects, then customize as necessary (one reason why knowing JavaScript is so important). You can use jQuery for things like countdown timers, search form autocomplete, and even automatically-rearranging and resizing grid layouts.
JavaScript Frameworks
JS frameworks (including Angular, Backbone, Ember, Vue.js, and React) give a ready-made structure to your JavaScript code.
Front End Frameworks
SS and front end frameworks (the most popular front end framework is Bootstrap) do for CSS what JS Frameworks do for JavaScript: they give you a jumping-off point for faster coding. Since so much CSS starts with exactly the same elements from project to project, a framework that defines all of these for you upfront is super valuable.
CSS Preprocessors
Preprocessors are another element that a front end developer can use to speed up CSS coding. A CSS preprocessor adds extra functionality to CSS to keep our CSS scalable and easier to work with. It processes your code before you publish it to your website, and turns it into well-formatted and cross-browser friendly CSS. Sass and LESS are the two most in-demand preprocessors.
RESTful Services and APIs
REST stands for Representational State Transfer. In basic terms, it’s a lightweight architecture that simplifies network communication on the web, and RESTful services and APIs are web services that adhere to REST architecture.

It’s a simple set of guidelines and practices that sets expectations so you know how to communicate with a web service. It also makes a web service perform better, scale better, work more reliably, and be easier to modify or move.

Testing and Debugging
Unit testing is the process of testing individual blocks of source code (the instructions that tell a website how it should work), and unit testing frameworks provide a specific method and structure for doing so (there are different ones for each programming language).

Another common type of testing is UI testing (also called acceptance testing, browser testing, or functional testing), where you check to make sure that the website behaves as it should when a user is actually using the site.

Debugging is simply taking all of the “bugs” (errors) those tests uncover (or your users uncover once your site is launched), putting on your detective hat to figure out why and how they’re happening, and fixing the problem.

Git & Version Control
Version control systems let you keep track of changes that have been made to code over time. They also make it easy to revert back to an earlier version if you screw something up.

Git is the most widely used of these version control management systems and can be installed using the command line. Knowing how to use Git is going to be a requirement for virtually any development job, be it front end development, back end development, or full stack development.

Problem Solving Skills
From figuring out how to best implement a design, to fixing bugs that crop up, to figuring out how to make your front end code work with the back end code another software engineer has written, development is all about creative problem solving.